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More Fatalities as NorCal Fires Impact Thousands

More Fatalities as NorCal Fires Impact Thousands

Fire crews on Wednesday made progress, but in the midst of that good news, another fatality was discovered. The death toll related to the ongoing NorCa fires has now reached 42.

Fire officials from CalFire confirmed a 23rd death in Sonoma County. That’s 22 from the Tubbs fire and one from the Nuns fire. In addition, there have been eight fatalities in Mendocino County, seven in Napa County and four in Yuba County.

Fog and cooler weather overall has assisted firefighters as they continue to work to eliminate the ongoing threats to life and property.

The Pocket fire has burned 12,430 acres and is 63% contained. It continues to be a challenge to firefighters, but backfire operations are expect to have a positive impact on containment and control.

Strike teams also burned vegetation in the path of the 54,423-acre Nuns fire, still burning in the hills connecting Sonoma and Napa counties.

The Nuns fire has claimed two lives — one in Sonoma County and one in Napa County. The Napa County victim was a CalFire contractor killed in a rollover accident.

Small offshoot fires continue to emerge. The Oakmont fire connected to the Nuns fire overnight, and was proving a challenge cue to steep mountainous terrain.

Overall, the Nuns fire was 80% contained as of this posting.

The deadliest of the NorCal blazes, the Tubbs fire, was essentially under control as of this morning. After destroying approximately 36,430 acres and reducing much of the city of Santa Rosa to ash, it is now 91% contained.

Firefighters are taking a more aggressive tact with the Tubbs fire to the south. Hand crews on foot and by air directly attacked flames creeping downhill east toward Napa Valley.

Most Sonoma County evacuation orders have been lifted for areas that weren’t burned, but residents in burn areas are still barred from returning home, as are evacuees from Geyserville and parts of the Sonoma Valley, Dugan said.

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